Paul McGann: “We can always come back”

Paul McGann may not be appearing in the 50th anniversary special, but he is still hopes that the Eighth Doctor will return to TV some day. While speaking about The Day of the Doctor, McGann told Flicks and the City:

“I was a bit dismayed because I always wanted to be in a 3D anything — even like Jaws 3D! I’d love to have been in any old rubbish. So I was bit gutted when I heard that’s what it was going to be like.

“There’s no McCoy… there’s no, you know… we’re not in it. Nor are we in the Christmas special let me tell you. I don’t think so anyway! Not unless they are going to shoot it next week.”

He also added:

“There’s all kind of rumours and counter-rumours and everything doing the rounds. One gets tired trying to refute things on Twitter and the like. Take it from me, I’m not in it.”

However, he does hope to return one day:

“The thing about Doctor Who of course is that if not now, then maybe some other time. That’s the beauty of it. We can always come back.”

McGann also commented on Peter Capaldi’s casting: “I think it’s in great hands… and hopefully he’ll swear like a trooper, like Malcolm Tucker!”

Watch the full interview below:

A Theory on The Doctor’s Greatest Secret

As the 50th anniversary draws clower there have been many theories concerning the overall story. One of the biggest mysteries yet to be revealed is what exactly did John Hurt’s Doctor do that was so horrible that he lost his title of “The Doctor”. Well, lets look at a few hints from previous episodes and see what we can come up with.

In the episode The Beast Below, the 11th Doctor mentions that he would have to change his name after killing the star whale because he would no longer be a Doctor. So it’s probaby safe to assume that death was involved (genocide?). In the episode The Doctor’s Wife, the Doctor admits he was responsible for the destruction of the Time Lords. One possible theory is that The Doctor did in fact kill all of the Time Lords but at a specific point in time. The time was (maybe) after the end of the largest Time Lord victory during the war at The Gates of Elysium.

Here’s the theory: after the battle at The Gates of Elysium, Davros had fallen, the Daleks were driven off Gallifrey by the Time Lords, and they were all but victorious. However, this victory wasn’t enough for the now power hungry Time Lords. They wanted to erase every last Dalek out of existence. A new offensive was led by the Time Lords and a second Great Time War began. Knowing the Time Lords had to be stopped, the Doctor took it upon himself to end this Second Time War before it started. He tells the Time Lords that he is finished fighting and walks away from the war effort. He leaves the Time War and the Time Lords to start building “The Moment”

The Doctor returns some time later and uses “The Moment” to destroy all of the Time Lords (much like the Immortality Gate in ‘The End of Time’) and converts all of them into regeneration energy which is absorbed by The Doctor (John Hurt) giving him billions of regeneration opportunities. Then using the power of all the Time Lords, the Doctor “time locks” the events of the first Time War so that the war mongering will cease.

I believe that the crimes of John Hurt’s Doctor was the desctruction of a billion Time Lord lives. This does away with his regeneration limit and also explains why there aren’t any Time Lords left after the Time War except those left locked during war time. Its possible he put them in an infinite loop of fighting the same battles with the same outcomes, always ending on the day of their demise and beginning again on the day the Daleks first invaded. This is after all just a theory…

Day of the Doctor Will Change the Course of Doctor Who

Head writer Steven Moffat has made another bold pubic statement saying that the The Day of the Doctor will change the course of Doctor Who as we know it.

During an interview with SFX (#241, out today), Moffat says:

“We’ve got to set the Doctor off in a brand new direction. It’s chapter two of his life. Now something happens to him that changes the way he thinks and the way he will adventure from now on. You can celebrate an anniversary in many ways – I think the most productive one within the narrative is to say “This is where the story really starts. This is where he finds his mission, he finds his destiny.”

Moffat also added:

“We’re not fibbing – this one is going to change the course of the series. And it’s very rare in Doctor Who that the story happens to the Doctor. It happens to people around him, and he helps out – he’s the hero figure who rides in and saves everybody from the story of the week. He is not the story of the week. In this, he is the story of the week. This is the day of the Doctor. This is his most important day. His most important moment. This is the one he’ll remember, whereas I often think the Doctor wanders back to his TARDIS and forgets all about it.”

Moffat also discussed the dynamic between the three [known] Doctors featured in the 50th:

“I wrote it as the friction version. When you’re talking to yourself there are no limitations, there’s no holding back. You wouldn’t be kind or courteous. At the same time, because they are two loveable, madcap, caffeinated Doctors, they’re also quite fanboyish about each other. They think it’s quite cool. They’re not broody, upset Doctors – it’s more “There’s two of us! Brilliant!” But that’s mostly in the playing, because they were having such a good time together that they brought that out. They get giggly with each other. It is, by lovely accident, a tremendous double-act. They’re naturally funny together. Enough alike and enough dissimilar. Matt said it was like Laurel and Laurel, as if Hardy didn’t show up – except he does in the form of John Hurt!”

“The weird thing is there’s never that much contrast between Doctors. The truth is it’s not wildly different how they’re written. I’ve written quite a lot for both of them, and you just have the voice in your head, very clearly. Where they are similar is funny, because they’re practically in unison, and where they are different is David is a cheeky, sexy, genuinely cool Doctor, up against a Doctor who thinks he’s sexy and cool but is woefully wrong on that subject! And that’s just naturally funny.”

Moffat discusses Capaldi’s Outfit and Regeneration Limit

During an interview with Radio Times on October 13th, Steven Moffat stated that Peter Capaldi is in the process of searching for his 12th Doctor’s attire.

Moffat said: “I think actually right now – I think literally right now. [Peter] was texting me ‘I’m out with [the wardrobe stylist] at the moment, it’s going quite well’ and some descriptions of clothes I did not understand. If it’s not a suit…”

He also added: “He likes his clothes. he’s got very strong opinions about clothes, he’s very dashing.”

Moffat’s input on Capaldi’s attire will be minimal though: “I’ll just let them get on with it and it’ll be ‘yes’ or ‘no’ a the end. Matt [Smith] said ‘I should be a boffin, I think I need to go with the bow tie’ and I said ‘No, absolutely not, you’re not wearing a bow tie – that’s a cartoon idea of what Doctor Who is… Oh, you are going to wear a bow tie – you look incredible in it. And from that moment on he suddenly came to life, and he put the tweed jacket on and suddenly he’s leaping round the room with a biro pen and that was it – he was the Doctor.”

Moffat also decided to tease Whovians with a cryptic statement regarding the Doctor’s regeneration limit:

Moffat today confirmed of the Doctor, “He can only regenerate 12 times”, while simultaneously suggesting there has been a miscalculation of how many regenerations he has actually been through.

“I think you should go back to your DVDs and count correctly this time,” said Moffat, “there’s something you’ve all missed.