The Twelfth Doctor’s Costume Revealed

Full Picture Here – The BBC has just released the first image of Peter Capaldi in his costume as the Doctor. So what do you think?

Press release:

The Doctor has a new look as Peter Capaldi’s era officially begins. In a picture released today by the BBC, Capaldi can be seen in the costume that will define his time as the Twelfth Time Lord in one of TV’s biggest roles. Sporting a dark blue Crombie coat with red lining, dark blue trousers, a white shirt as well as black Dr. Marten shoes, the look was created by Doctor Who costume designer Howard Burden.

Commenting on his costume, Peter Capaldi said: “He’s woven the future from the cloth of the past. Simple, stark, and back to basics. No frills, no scarf, no messing, just 100 per cent Rebel Time Lord.” While lead writer and executive producer Steven Moffat added: “New Doctor, new era, and of course new clothes. Monsters of the universe, the vacation is over – Capaldi is suited and booted and coming to get you!”

Filming for episode one of series 8 began earlier this month, after 10.2 million tuned-in on Christmas Day to get their first much-anticipated glimpse of Capaldi’s Doctor. Charlotte Moore, Controller of BBC One, commented: “Peter Capaldi’s Doctor is officially recorded in history today with the unveiling of his new costume. It’s sharp, smart and stylish – The Twelfth Time Lord means business.”

The 12th Doctor

The 10 Most Wanted Missing Episodes of Classic Doctor Who

According to Doctor Who TV:

Earlier in the week Doctor Who TV asked you to vote on the missing episodes you most wanted to see. Ahead of the impending announcement we can now present the results.

Unsurprisingly, the Dalek stories reigned supreme claiming the top three positions. Of the three, The Power of the Daleks comfortably took the top spot to become your most wanted.

  1. The Power of the Daleks (13.97%)
  2. The Daleks’ Master Plan (10.6%)
  3. The Evil of the Daleks (10.4%)
  4. The Tenth Planet (9.59%)
  5. The Web of Fear (7.48%)
  6. Marco Polo (5.74%)
  7. The Abominable Snowmen (5.43%)
  8. The Celestial Toymaker (4.62%)
  9. The Ice Warriors (4.53%)
  10. Fury from the Deep (3.52%)

More than 100 lost Doctor Who episodes were found by dedicated fans…in Ethiopia?

A group of dedicated Whovians have tracked down 100 long-lost episodes of the show that have been gathering dust 3,000 miles away in Ethiopia.

 The BBC ­feared the programmes from the 1960s, featuring the first two doctors William Hartnell and Patrick Troughton, had dissapeared forever after the BBC discarded a bunch of old footage.

Luckily, after months of ­searching the tapes have been found at the Ethiopian Radio and Television Agency. An insider with the agency said:

“It is a triumph and fans ­everywhere will be thrilled. This is a really big deal for the BBC and is set to make them millions from the sale of the DVDs.”

If the tapes are returned to the BBC in time, they hope to announce the news to go along with Doctor Who’s 50th ­anniversary next month. The lost episodes from the 60s include fan favorites from The Crusade, The Enemy of the World and The Ice Warriors series.

In the four-part Crusade story Hartnell and his ­assistant Vicki, played by Maureen O’Brien, travel in the TARDIS to Palestine during the 12th century when King Richard the Lionheart was battling with the Saracen ruler Saladin.

After only airing once between 1964 and 1969, these copies were sold to the Ethiopian Agency and the BBC lost or disposed of the originals. As the BBC still owns the copyright the episodes could be digitally remastered before being released to the public.

Former Doctor, Paul McGann Stirs Up More 50th Anniversary Rumors

It must be getting old really quick for Paul McGann to have to deny rumors about making an apperance in the Doctor Who 50th anniversary, but it doesn’t help that the majority of these rumors come directly from his personal Twitter feed.

Last night, Whovian excitement was stirred up with a tweet from the McGann himself saying: “Spent forty minutes this pm having to imitate Matt Smith’s dramatic delivery in VO. You have been warned….”

However, he quickly followed up the tweet with an explanation: “I should explain. It was by way of an aural experiment to find out how similar we might sound. We didn’t. And he’s better looking too.”

McGann already denied involvement when asked directly: “No, I’m not in the 50th, though plenty of beautiful and talented people are.”

Guess we’ll have to wait 50 days until we know for sure…

Steven Moffat Wants Fifty More Years of Doctor WHO!

Head writer Steven Moffat explained why The Day of the Doctor will not just be a “parade of the greatest hits” and how he hopes that Doctor Who stays on the air for another fifty years.

In an extract from The Doctor: His Lives And Times [Via], Moffat says:

“You’re going to get every kind of retrospective in the world when it comes to the 50th and you’re not going to be short. To make this show just a walk-down, just a tribute to the past, a backward glance, would be like one of those end of year shows: ‘That was the year that was! Look back and feel slightly old and sad.’ Don’t do that! Of course it’s a celebration of the legend of Doctor Who, but more importantly it’s ensuring there’s going to be a 100th anniversary.

He adds: “It’s a hugely important story to the Doctor. That was my mission statement. Very, very rarely in Doctor Who does a story matter to him very much at all. Obviously he runs around, defeats mutants, meets a space badger, saves a civilisation, causes epiphanies to happen to everyone he meets, rushes back to the TARDIS and forgets everything about it. If you asked him he might have a vague memory of the badger, and that’s it.

“My intent was to move it forward, to have a show that’s equally about the next fifty years of Doctor Who. Attaching the word fifty to anything… I almost tried to rip the logo off saying ‘Why is that good?! That show you’re watching is really old!’ Why is that a good thing to say? It’s about proving we’ve got many, many more stories to tell, and in a way, being able to say the story really starts here. People ask me how am I going to please the regular audience and I say I’m actually on a recruitment drive to get the people who’ve never watched it before to watch Doctor Who. That’s what matters. There are some people out there who’ve never watched it before, God help them. You want them to think, ‘Oh I’ve been missing out, I’m going to join in now.’

“If you’re going to celebrate Doctor Who, you’re celebrating the Doctor – well, why not tell his story? What’s it like for him? What’s it like being him, what defines him, what defines what he is? How do you make that might moment in his life? What would be the Doctor’s most important day, what would be the show that would change him as a person for ever, alter the course of his life?

“That’s what’s big enough to do for the 50th, rather than just a parade of the greatest hits. Never mind that space badger one; this is the adventure that he really remembers, and thinks, ‘That was the day everything changed.’”

 

How the second Doctor, Patrick Troughton, saved Doctor Who.

Doctor Who may have not lasted fifty wonderful years if the plot device of Time Lord regeneration was not created. Patrick Troughton played the second incarnation of the nortorious Time Lord and he will be featured in a 50th anniversary docudrama titled An Adventure in Space and Time by Reece Shearsmith of the League of Gentlemen.

When William Hartnel began to suffer from poor health in 1966, the idea to have the Doctor regenerate gave the show the ability to recast their star character. This was a risk however, as viewers might not accept that the Doctor could change in appearance and personality. And even if they audience accepted that idea, would they like the new Doctor? It was an incredibly big gamble and that’s why fans often say Patrick Troughton had the hardest job as the new Doctor.

The Doctor’s first regeneration is a tremendous sight to see and Troughton appears along with the sound of the Tardis materialising. There was some initial backlash at first. Fans of the show missed the Doctor they had already come to know and love. It’s truely is a testament to Patrick Troughton’s skills as an actor that he was able to be such a successful Doctor.

Patrick Troughton added his own personal touch to the character. The Doctor was no longer a grandfatherly gentlemen that Hartnell’s Doctor was, and became a more playful man with a mop of dark Beatles hair that fit perfectly with the era of the 1960’s. The new Doctor brought a more enthusiastic and energetic quality to the role. Troughton’s three year run as the Doctor thoroughly established Doctor Who once more as a family favourite but took the show into new territory.

The prominence of historical stories lessened and futurist stories became a stronger theme both on Earth and elsewhere in the universe. The Cybermen returned and became much more menacing than previous encounters. The organization UNIT as well as Brigadier were introduced doing battle with Yeti and other fearful creatures. The Time Lords were also introduced for the first time in his final story, The War Games, where they punish the Doctor for his interfering in the affairs of alien races and sentence him to regenerate again and be exiled to Earth.

Patrick Troughton was a trailblazer for every new Doctors that followed and he remains a fan favourite. He returned to the show three times in the Three, Five and Two Doctors stories and attended Whovian events for almost twenty years after leaving the rold. He passed away while at a Doctor Who convention in America at the age of 67 in 1987. His legacy as the Doctor is immense and it’s hard not to see similarities between Troughton and eleventh Doctor Matt Smith. Between the bow ties, hilariously expressive face or the rediculous way they run it’s clear that 2 and 11 are both cut from the same Time Lord cloth.